Printing pretty tables with Python in ArcGIS

This post would of interest to ArcGIS users authoring custom Python script tools who need to print out tables in the tool dialog box. You would also benefit from the following information if you need to print out some information in the Python window of ArcMap doing some ad hoc data exploration.

Fairly often your only way to communicate the results of the tool execution is to print out a table that the user could look at. It is possible to create an Excel file using a Python package such as xlsxwriter or by exporting an existing data structure such as a pandas data frame into an Excel or .csv file which user could open. Keep in mind that it is possible to start Excel with the file open using the os.system command:

os.system('start excel.exe {0}'.format(excel_path))

However, if you only need to print out some simple information into a table format within the dialog box of the running tool, you could construct such a table using built-in Python. This is particularly helpful in those cases where you cannot guarantee that the end user will have the 3rd party Python packages installed or where the output table is really small and it is not supposed to be analyzed or processed further.

However, as soon as you would try to build something flexible with the varying column width or when you don’t know beforehand what output columns and what data the table will be printed with, it gets very tedious. You need to manipulate multiple strings and tuples making sure everything draws properly.

In these cases, it is so much nicer to be able to take advantage of the external Python packages where all these concerns have been already taken care of. I have been using the tabulate, but there are a few others such as PrettyTable and texttable both of which will generate a formatted text table using ASCII characters.

To give you a sense of the tabulate package, look at the code necessary to produce a nice table using the ugly formatted strings (the first part) and using the tabulate package (the second part):

The output of the table produced using the built-in modules only:

builtin

The output of the table produced using the tabulate module:

tabulate

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s